State Sector

Focusing on your sector

PSA membership in the state sector sector is growing rapidly. To make sure your interests are fully represented, we've made changes to our structure and created a structure for members working in the wider state services – the State Sector.

The State Sector has its own national committee and a seat on the PSA Executive Board, this ensures your sector has a voice at all levels of PSA decision-making.

The difference the PSA can make

We know that funding in the sector is tight.  It is getting harder for organisations to meet the growing demands in their communities and elsewhere.  It's also getting harder to provide employees with job security and the pay and conditions they deserve.

The services and support that you provide are important.  With a growing membership, the PSA will be in your corner.  We have the expertise to work with you for decent pay and employment conditions, a good working environment, and for your voice to be included in workplace decisions. 

We will be a strong advocate for you and for the work you do.

Documents

News from the PSA. Our new national secretary
News

Our new national secretary

Erin Polaczuk is the new national secretary who joins Richard Wagstaff in the senior leadership team.

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News from the PSA. Sneaking privatisation
News

Sneaking privatisation

When the National Government sold 49 percent of Genesis Energy, prime minister John Key promised it would be the last asset sale that his government would undertake.

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News from the PSA. Hui taumata
News

Hui taumata

Hui taumata, the peak body for the PSA rūnanga, ngā Toa Āwhina, was held at Orongomai marae, Upper Hutt, in early August.

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News from the PSA. Behind the scenes - delegates supporting members
News

Behind the scenes - delegates supporting members

Trained, experienced delegates can play an important role in supporting members who are on the carpet because of a complaint or concern.

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News

Facts of the matter: Exploring the gender pay gaps

The pay gap between the average hourly wage for men and women has stuck stubbornly around 12 to 13 percent – that is, women get 12 to 13 percent less than men – since 2007.

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