Network briefs: June 2016


USE2PSA Youth

The very popular youth leadership training ran from March – May in Auckland, Hamilton, Wellington, Christchurch and Dunedin. 125 members attended the training across the five centres.

Feedback from the training days has been great, with members feeling energised to step up to leadership roles in the union, their workplace and community. Many have already become delegates, or organised activities since attending. 

The training is about building people up to leadership roles in the union, their workplaces and communities. And it works – we get lots of union leaders out of the training. There has been a 10% increase in youth delegates since the training last year. Youth representation on sector committees has increased from one member to eight.

The days have been informative and fun, with many attendees already making plans to get together again and discuss how to put their leadership plans into action.  We’ve also already heard from many attendees keen to step up to leadership roles in the union, yay, go yoof! 

Out@PSA

Members of our growing Out@PSA network were actively involved in March in the ILGA Oceania Human Rights and Health Conference: Re-stoke the Fires Tāwhiritia ngā ahi.

Out@PSA members were involved both in the organising of the conference and the delivery of two workshops – one on diversity training, and one on the impacts of climate change on LGBTI* communities in the Pacific. There were an amazing variety of workshops – you can view photos from the conference here:
proud.org.nz/gallery.

Abbi Pritchard-Jones, one of ten Out@PSA members who attended the conference, had this to say:

“The conference was a spectacular melting pot of narratives – hopes, challenges and dreams…bringing us together, giving us the opportunity to share our collected wisdom and plan for a brighter, more equal, more self-determined, authentic future. Inspiration, passion and intensity oozed from the conference floor and workshops, amplifying our thirst to engage in our communities essential issues. I was exhausted at the end, but would not have missed it for anything.”