PSA response to announcement of new Housing and Urban Development Authority (HUDA)

Today’s announcement of plans to form a new Crown entity centred on Housing New Zealand - with a full integration of Housing New Zealand's urban development subsidiary HLC and the KiwiBuild Unit - has been cautiously welcomed by the Public Service Association (PSA).

"Already this year we have seen a new Ministry of Housing and Urban Development set up under Minister for Housing and Urban Development, Phil Twyford, so his announcement today that an operationally focused Housing and Urban Development Authority (HUDA) will be established by the end of 2019 reflects a continuation of that new policy direction", said Glenn Barclay, PSA national secretary.

"The PSA will be heavily focused on working alongside our members at Housing New Zealand during the months of planning for the transition from HNZ to HUDA that will commence soon and continue throughout 2019.

"As more details of the transition and the legislation that will empower the new entity of HUDA emerge we will be carefully monitoring the impact on our members in what is being positioned as a ‘growth phase’.

"The clear emphasis given by Minister Twyford today that Housing New Zealand’s housing and landlord role will continue as a key role of HUDA, in parallel to combined urban development projects, is vitally important - as is the assurance that Housing New Zealand tenants and public housing objectives will be protected," said Glenn Barclay.

"From the wider perspective of New Zealand’s housing crisis, the general direction of a greater pace that prioritises state housing, affordable housing and well-designed communities within a quality urban context is positive.

"At the PSA we have been advocating for shifts in thinking through our Progessive Thinking publication ‘Ten perspectives on housing’, and when we surveyed our wider membership (now reaching 70,000 members) on this issue last year, there was an overwhelming call for greater action on housing".

See also: PSA Progressive Thinking: Ten Perspectives On Housing